Pages in category "World War II naval ships of the United Kingdom" The following 40 pages are in this category, out of 40 total.

Royal Navy ships in ADM 176; battle damage to ships, air and sea attacks and other photographs taken before, during or after operations in CN 1; views of the Mulberry artificial harbours constructed for the Allied invasion of Normandy in WO 24; Consult our Photographic series guide for details of other ADM series that contain photographs. This is an alphabetical list of the names of all ships that have been in service with the Royal Navy, or with predecessor fleets formally in the service of the Kingdom of England or the Commonwealth of England. The list includes both commissioned and warrant officers, and along with names, lists can indicate rank, seniority, decorations, and other details. All were of a "turtle-back" design and, excepting a few "builder's specials", powered by reciprocating engines. This database includes multiple volumes of the Navy List, the Royal Navy’s official published list of officers. This list may not reflect recent changes ( learn more ). Marineschule Mürwick, Mürwik Flensburg, Germany. These cards were created by the Army Medal Office (AMO) of the United Kingdom in Droitwich near the close of World War I (WWI). T he Royal Navy, still the largest in the world in September 1939, included 15 battleships, 7 aircraft carriers, 66 cruisers, 184 destroyers, 60 submarines, and many smaller craft. NAVAL WARFARE. The Royal Navy would be responsible for the North Sea and most of the Atlantic, although the French would contribute some forces. Note that, unlike many other naval services, the Royal Navy designates certain types of shore establishment (e.g. In 1913, lettered names were given to all Royal Navy destroyers, previously known after the first ship of that class. Essential information . This is a list of fictional names of note. This is a list of destroyer classes of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom, organised chronologically by entry into service. BY TYPE.

Articles incorporating text from Wikipedia, Military units and formations of the United Kingdom, List of ship names of the Royal Navy (D–F), List of ship names of the Royal Navy (G–H), List of ship names of the Royal Navy (I–L), List of ship names of the Royal Navy (M–N), List of ship names of the Royal Navy (O–Q), List of ship names of the Royal Navy (R–T), List of ship names of the Royal Navy (U–Z), List of aircraft carriers of the Royal Navy, List of amphibious warfare ships of the Royal Navy, List of pre-dreadnought battleships of the Royal Navy, List of dreadnought battleships of the Royal Navy, List of fast patrol boats of the Royal Navy, List of corvettes and sloops of the Royal Navy, List of gunboats and gunvessels of the Royal Navy, List of mine countermeasure vessels of the Royal Navy, List of ships of the line of the Royal Navy, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Bibliography of 18th-19th century Royal Naval history, Ships of the Royal Navy: The Complete Record of all Fighting Ships of the Royal Navy, https://military.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_ship_names_of_the_Royal_Navy?oldid=4370588.

The list also includes fictional vessels which have prominently featured in literature about the Royal Navy. Organizations and items included among list lists varied over time. Birth, Marriage & Death, including Parish, Getting Started, Lesson 1: Starting Your Tree, Operated by Ancestry Ireland Unlimited Company. This is an alphabetical list of all the names of ships that have ever been in service with the Royal Navy, as well as a list of fictional vessels in literature about the Royal Navy. There are also lists of ships with their officers and current stations, as well as lists of pensioners and retired officers. Ships of the Royal Navy in World War II Battleships, Aircraft Carriers, Cruisers. For example, officers are grouped by rank. barracks, naval air stations and training establishments) as "ships" and names them accordingly. The list also includes fictional vessels which have prominently featured in literature about the Royal Navy. This database contains the Medal Rolls Index, or Medal Index Cards. The Navy List includes numerous groupings.

This database contains service records of non-commissioned officers and other ranks who were discharged from the Army and claimed disability pensions for service in WWI. These records reveal the location of Royal Navy ships and submarines, wherever they were in the world, and the voyages they took, from around 1669 to 1986. Sometimes other elements of life aboard ship were recorded too, but rarely do logs provide personal information on the officers and crew of a particular ship. Regardless of whatever enemy she faced in World War 2, the Royal Navy and her powerful warships fought with fervor on all fronts. Updated January 27, 2012. The River or E class of 1913 were the first destroyers of the Royal Navy with a high forecastles instead of "turtleback" bow making this the first class with a more recognizable modern configuration. It should be stressed that these A to D class designations did not exist before 1913, and only applied to those "turtle-backed" destroyers surviving to that time. Altogether over 13,000 ships have been in service with the Royal Navy.[1]. Altogether over 13,000 ships have been in service with the Royal Navy. This is an alphabetical list of the names of all ships that have been in service with the Royal Navy, or with predecessor fleets formally in the service of the Kingdom of England or the Commonwealth of England. Altogether over 13,000 ships have been in service with the Royal Navy.[1]. The records can be searched by first and last name and Corps, Unit or Regiment. BY CONFLICT. The River or E class of 1913 were the first destroyers of the Royal Navy with a high forecastles instead of "turtleback" bow making this the first class with a more recognizable modern configuration. WW2 British Warships and Submarines (1939-1945) Naval Warfare / Ships.

Due to the large number of names the list has been split into smaller lists: Many novels and films about the Royal Navy feature fictional ships, but most use real names. This is an alphabetical list of all the names of ships that have ever been in service with the Royal Navy, as well as a list of fictional vessels in literature about the Royal Navy.Many of the names have been re-used over the years and thus represent more than one ship. These include admirals, commanders, captains, lieutenants, chaplains, carpenters, boatswains, artificer engineers, gunners, surgeons, and others. Names are traditionally re-used over the years, and have been carried by more than one ship. COUNTRIES. The collection currently contains approximately 4.8 million people, which is nearly all of the total collection. Where real ship names are used fictionally, there is a link to the actual ships using that name. MODERN FLEETS. Unlike many other naval services, the Royal Navy designates certain types of shore establishment (e.g. BY DECADE. These were also men who did not re-enlist in the Army prior to World War II. These establishments are often referred to in service slang as stone frigates. This is a list of fictional names of note. Published regularly since 1814, the Navy List is a good starting place for researching the career of an officer in the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Queen Alexandra’s Royal Nursing Service, Coast Guard, and other naval entities. The following were ordered as part of the War Emergency Programme classes: World War II War Emergency Programme destroyers, Naming conventions for destroyers of the Royal Navy, "List of destroyer classes of the Royal Navy", Learn how and when to remove this template message, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_destroyer_classes_of_the_Royal_Navy&oldid=987948379, Military units and formations of the United Kingdom, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, 1896-97 Programme (special type): 1 ship, 1899, This page was last edited on 10 November 2020, at 05:02. The list includes both commissioned and warrant officers, and along with names, lists can indicate rank, seniority, decorations, and other details. In 1913, lettered names were given to all Royal Navy destroyers, previously known after the first ship of that class. Many novels and films about the Royal Navy feature fictional ships, but most use real names. In 1913, the surviving members of the large heterogeneous array of older 27-knot and 30-knot torpedo boat destroyer types (all six of the original 26-knot ships had been disposed of by the end of 1912) were organised into the A, B, C and D classes according to their design speed and the number of funnels they possessed.