USS Crittenden (APA-77) was a Gilliam-class attack transport that served with the US Navy during World War II. A few were found to have mostly escaped the radioactive fallout and were taken back to the United States. It is not clear therefore why they were produced but probably it was simply because attack transports were at this time a much-needed type and the Navy chose to utilize any available shipbuilding capacity to acquire them.

H. B. Olsen in command. Some of the earlier vessels saw action at either the Battle of Luzon or the Battle of Iwo Jima and later at the Invasion of Okinawa, while later vessels saw combat either at Okinawa alone or not at all. The Gilliam-class utilized the Maritime Commission (MARCOM)'s Type S4-SE2-BD1 hull. Of these, a few were sunk by the atomic bombs themselves, while a number of others which received heavy doses of radiation were examined for a period before being disposed of in target practice in 1947 or 1948. They saw little combat but served a vital support role during World War II.

Commissioned late in the war, she was initially assigned to transport duties and consequently did not participate in combat operations. |state=expanded: {{Gilliam class attack transport|state=expanded}} to show the template expanded, i.e., fully visible |state=autocollapse : {{Gilliam class attack transport|state=autocollapse}} shows the template collapsed to the title bar if there is a {{ navbar }} , a {{ sidebar }} , or some other table on the page with the collapsible attribute After returning to Cebu in the Philippines 29 October, she became part of the Operation Magic Carpet fleet and sailed 2 November with 1,000 sailors and soldiers, debarking them at Portland, Oregon, 21 November 1945. Coming under limited fire, the Japanese plane released a torpedo two minutes later which smashed into SS Antoine Saugrain. Many of the ships saw little service before being scrapped, many were uses as target ships. At the end of the war, the US Navy found itself with far more ships than it required in peacetime. The other Type S4 attack cargo ships were the Artemis and Arcturusclasses, both S4-SE2-BE1. The unnamed attack transport APA-61 was laid down on 28 January 1944 at Wilmington, California, by the Consolidated Steel Corporation, under a Maritime Commission contract ; named for Barrow County, Georgia, on 11 March 1944; launched on 11 May 1944; accepted by the Navy on 27 September 1944; and commissioned on 28 September 1944 at San Pedro, California, Lieutenant Commander Herman Jorgensen, USNR, in command.

These vessels were specially designed for unloading cargo over the side into landing craft that were carried on the transport. All four ships were built by the Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation, at Chickasaw, Alabama. They were designed to transport 1,500 troops and their combat equipment, and land them on hostile shores with the ships' integral landing craft. In the event, one - USS Appling (APA-58) - was reprieved, so exactly half of the class' 32 ships were designated as targets. USS Crenshaw (APA-76) arriving at Tacoma, WA., 11 December 1945 with returning troops embarked at Nagoya, Japan, 27 November 1945. Arriving late in the war, she took part in the invasion of Iwo Jima, 19 February to 26 March 1945, and carried out subsequent transport missions.

Custom built Gilliam Class Attack Transport ship models such as this one of the USS Garrard (APA 84) are available as both investment and museum quality models. Ships of the class were named after generals of the United States Marine Corps.

It is not clear therefore why they were produced but probably it was simply because attack transports were at this time a much-needed type and the Navy chose to utilize any available shipbuilding capacity to acquire them.

Since the Gilliam class had an inferior transport and cargo capacity to many of the other attack transport classes, it was an obvious candidate for disposal.

APA-57 Gilliam-class attack transports Launched on March 28, 1944, Gilliam was the first of 32 Gilliam-class attack transports, specially designed vessels that served as amphibious ships. The Doyen-class attack transport was a class of two attack transports that saw service with the US Navy in World War II. Gilliam was part of a 36-ship convoy churning toward the Philippines when, on 5 December 1944, the convoy came under heavy air attack while 100 miles (160 km) from Leyte Gulf. The first of the ships, the USS Gilliam (APA-57), rolled off the Wilmington ways on 28 March 1944 and was commissioned on 1 August 1944. Gilliam transport ships were constructed in 1944 and 1945. The USS Gilliam served as a target for U.S. nuclear weapons testing. Men of the Headquarters and Service Battalions, 5th Amphibious Corps came on board at Hawaii, and Gilliam sailed 1 September for Sasebo, Japan, and put her occupation troops ashore 3 weeks later. As they arrived relatively late in the war, Gilliam-class ships did not get much chance to see combat.

Like all attack transports, the purpose of the Gilliams was to transport troops and their equipment to foreign shores in order to execute amphibious invasions using an array of smaller amphibious assault boats carried by the attack transport itself. The Gilliam-class attack transport was a class of attack transport built for service with the US Navy in World War II. The rest rapidly followed, a new Gilliam-class vessel rolling of the shipways at an average of roughly one per week until April 1945. The first of the ships, USS Gilliam (APA-57), rolled off the Wilmington ways on 28 March 1944 and was commissioned on 1 August 1944.

As the war progressed, the 20 mm cannon were found to be less effective than the 40 mm, and the later Gilliam and Haskell classes dispensed with some of these mounts. USS Barrow (APA-61) was a Gilliam class attack transport serving in the United States Navy during World War II.

US Navy Sumner Class Destroyer models are built by professional Master Model Builders with more than 35 years experience.

Of these, a few were sunk by the atomic bombs themselves, while a number of others which received heavy doses of radiation were examined for a period before being disposed of in target practice in 1947 or 1948. Intense fire from the convoy drove the planes off, but later that afternoon another Japanese aircraft dove in at 15:30, and after running into heavy fire, made a suicide crash on SS Marcus Daly. As they arrived relatively late in the war, Gilliam-class ships did not get much chance to see combat. Gilliam was made ready for testing in Pearl Harbor after its arrival on February 16, 1946. Commissioned late in the war, she was initially assigned to transport duties and consequently did not participate in combat operations. The Gilliam-class attack transport was a class of attack transport built for service with the US Navy in World War II. Exposure to asbestos, however, resulted in many veterans developing asbestos diseases many years after their initial exposure. Like all attack transports, the purpose of the Gilliams was to transport troops and their equipment to foreign shores in order to execute amphibious invasions using an array of smaller amphibious assault boats carried by the attack transport itself.

[2]. USS Briscoe (APA-65), was a Gilliam-class attack transport laid down in 1944, served during World War II, and decommissioned in 154 (number) (534 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article The Gilliam-class attack transport was a class of attack transport built for service with the US Navy in World War II. 17 of the Gilliam class were duly selected to act as targets in the tests. Copyright document.write(new Date().getFullYear()) MesotheliomaHelp.orgThe information provided by Mesothelioma Help is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

For the purpose, the Navy collected somewhere between 70 and 90 unwanted ships to use as targets, some captured from the enemy and some of the Navy's own. Sarasota was named for Sarasota County, Florida. These vessels were specially designed for unloading cargo over the side into landing craft that were carried on the transport. The Navy valued asbestos because it was lightweight, heat resistant and fireproof. Haskell-class attack transports (APA) were amphibious assault ships of the United States Navy created in 1944. These survivors, along with the rest of the class, were decommissioned in late 1946-early 1947 and saw no further service with the Navy (although it is unknown whether some may have been later sold for commercial service). She off-loaded cargo and passengers at Okinawa and then headed back to San Francisco. Belluck & Fox, LLP obtains justice for Navy veterans by holding the asbestos companies responsible for their failure to warn. USS Carlisle (APA-69) was a Gilliam-class attack transport that served with the US Navy during World War II. Able was detonated at an altitude of 520 feet on July 1, 1946 and Baker was detonated 90 feet under water on July 25, 1946. Although 3 detonations were initially planned, only 2 were actually carried out. The bomb instead detonated close to Gilliam and the ship sank in less than 2 minutes. An alternative reference for dates and basic information is the Attack Transport Index page of Navsource Online.

Mesothelioma Help Cancer Organization is sponsored by Belluck & Fox, LLPSite by Consultwebs. Anton Saugraine and Marcus Daly were kept afloat by quick damage control, but the former ship was attacked again the next day while under tow and finally sunk. Gilliam also took part in the assault on Okinawa. USS Gasconade (APA-85) was a Gilliam-class attack transport that served with the US Navy during World War II. Learn more about how our nationally-recognized asbestos attorneys help veterans and their families during a free case review with Belluck & Fox, LLP.

As they arrived relatively late in the war, Gilliam-class ships did not get much chance to see combat. The 1956 movie Away All Boats presents operations on an attack transport. A second kamikaze tried his luck but missed and crashed into the sea after repeated hits from the convoy's gunners. Commissioned late in the war, she was initially assigned to transport duties and consequently did not participate in combat operations. 17 of the Gilliam class were duly selected to act as targets in the tests. She returned to Leyte on 14 January to embark elements of the 32nd Infantry Division and brought them safely back to Lingayen Gulf 27 January. A few were found to have mostly escaped the radioactive fallout and were taken back to the United States. A gaggle of Gilliam-class vessels at Pearl Harbor, awaiting disposal in Operation Crossroads - from front to rear, Crittenden (APA-77), Catron (APA-71), Bracken (APA-64), Burleson (APA-67), Gilliam (APA-57), Fallon (APA-81), one unidentified ship, and Fillmore (APA-83). Their purpose was to transport troops and military equipment for the execution of amphibious invasions on foreign soil using smaller amphibious assault boats. She was of the VC2-S-AP5 Victory ship design type and named after Pitt County, North Carolina. These were smaller ships with shallow drafts, intended from the start for military use and designed to carry a great deal of combat equipment along with passengers.

She was of the VC2-S-AP5 Victory ship design type.