The Mapuche rapper Waikil is a rising star in the country’s music scene, and professional soccer players have shown their support by displaying the Wenufoye on armbands or in team photos. Now, this indigenous group is among the 10 indigenous peoples recognized by the Chilean state. Copyright notice: © Minority Rights Group International. The scene was “soul-destroying,” said Ms. Ramírez Lepin, and a reminder of past violence and discrimination. Since its creation a significant amount of land has been returned to indigenous communities, particularly to the Mapuche in southern Chile. Activists are also pressing political leaders to create legislative quotas for Indigenous people, and the Senate is considering setting aside seats for Indigenous people in the constitutional assembly. In “Los Changos de las Costas de Chile” (“Chango of the Chilean Coasts”), by Richard Latcham and published in 1910, Latcham mentioned that the term Chango was not meant for one specific group, but rather used to describe several groups of people that inhabited the coastal areas in northern Chile. ” (“We are Chango”), financed by the National Fund for Arts and Cultural Development, shows how the community that currently inhabits the Pan de Azúcar cove carries the cultural inheritance of Chango, as they practice the same activities the Chango did: In January 2020, the National Council for Chango People was created, to fight for the recognition of the ethnic group.

But the strife amplified public support for the Mapuche’s demands and pushed their cause to the top of the political agenda just weeks before Chileans decide whether to overhaul their Constitution, potentially creating the first opportunity in decades for official recognition of Chile’s Indigenous communities. A new Constitution could go a long way toward giving the Mapuche the rights to land and the respect for their culture they have demanded for decades. This is not a UNHCR publication.

A referendum over a new Constitution provides them a chance to be included. Arson attacks against trucks traveling through southern Chile. In Chile, where two decades of economic growth have resulted in strong reductions in overall poverty levels, 1 indigenous peoples continue to be disproportionately poor (Valenzuela, 2003, World Bank, 2002) despite social program that have been targeted toward these groups. The initiative is now ready to be enacted into law by President Sebastián Piñera. The documentary “Somos Changos” (“We are Chango”), financed by the National Fund for Arts and Cultural Development, shows how the community that currently inhabits the Pan de Azúcar cove carries the cultural inheritance of Chango, as they practice the same activities the Chango did: fishing, shellfish extraction, and diving. ethnic groups. A referendum over a new Constitution provides them a chance to be included. It has 27 hectares, w…, ️ The Constitutional Court partially accepted the request of government coalition Chile Vamos, which opposes sanct…, ️ The country also won in other categories. “It was emotional,” said Ms. Ramírez Lepin, who participated in the protests. Since the late 1990s this conflict has become increasingly violent, prompting sharp criticism from the UN of the Chilean government for its treatment of the Mapuche. But a growing number of Chileans are sympathetic to the Mapuche, and see the conflicts of recent weeks as the latest flash point in a decades-long struggle against the state over land rights, recognition of their culture and the often brutal tactics of security forces. According to the 2012 census, 11.3 per cent of the total population self-identify as indigenous. The first Jewish immigrants to Chile came from Russia and Eastern Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. Amid the country’s lockdown came a hunger strike by several Mapuche prisoners, including Celestino Córdova, a spiritual leader who is serving an 18-year sentence for murder.

Following Chile’s independence in 1818, Europeans settled the fertile lands that had long been the domain of the Mapuche. Chile’s Mapuche have long demanded official recognition of their culture and of their claims to ancestral lands.

“The Mapuche conflict has become a pressure cooker,” said Verónica Figueroa Huencho, a visiting scholar at Harvard University who is Mapuche. These reliable estimates of poverty and inequality may improve the antipoverty targeting criteria used in Chile. The protests were leaderless and broad, and did not result in one specific lists of requests.