The ARC project was led by Professor John Maynard at the University of Newcastle, and also included researchers Professor Victoria Haskins, Dr Lawrence Bamblett, Dr Lorina Barker, Professor Jakelin Troy, and Dr Ray Kelly. For the first time, a comprehensive investigation of the Board's activities and subsequent effects on the lives and families of Aboriginal people in NSW will be undertaken including both archival and oral history research. Lead chief investigator and Director of the Wollotuka Institute Worimi man Professor John Maynard says it's crucial this research is conducted while people who lived under the control of the Board are still alive. Wikipedia, Nation of Aboriginal Indigenous Australian tribes from the southern States, Australia.

Under this act the deeds of land at the Lake Tyers Mission and Framlingham reserves were transferred to the communities.

Charles Duguid was a founding board member; other board members included J. John Gribble. The records of the Board are important because they document activities that had a major impact on the lives of Aboriginal people, in particular the 'Stolen Generations' who … These were rediscovered over a century later and eventually published in London in 1941 by the Aboriginal Protection Board. Aboriginal children were removed from their homes for various welfare reasons and transported to Kinchela and Cootamundra, where they were often abused and neglected while being taught farm labouring and domestic work, many of them ending up as servants in the homes of wealthy Sydney residents.

The Aborigines Act 1969 was a New South Wales statute that repealed the Aborigines Protection Act 1909, abolished the Aborigines Welfare Board, included Aboriginal children under the same welfare legislation as non-Aboriginal children, amended the Attachment of Wages Limitation Act 1957 and made other provisions for Aboriginal people in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It was created by the Aborigines Protection Act, 1886 (WA), also known as the Half-Caste Act, described as An Act to provide for the better protection and management of the Aboriginal Natives of Western Australia, and to amend the Law relating to certain Contracts with such Aboriginal Natives (statute 25/1886), and The Aborigines Act, 1889 (statute 24/1889).[8][9]. As the boards had limited funds protectors received very limited remuneration, and so a range of people were appointed as local protectors, including resident magistrates, jail wardens, justices of the peace and in some cases ministers of religion, though most were local police inspectors. Such documents are not recognized as valid by the Australian government or its Australian Customs and Border Protection Service, although some people have been permitted to re-enter Australia using such documents. The Aborigines Welfare Board was abolished under the Aborigines Act 1969 (NSW). It also implemented the creation of Aboriginal reserves to control the dwelling places and movement of the people. List of laws concerning Indigenous Australians, Australian Aboriginal Progress Association, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Indigenous All-Stars (Australian rules football), List of Indigenous Australian sportspeople, Department of Aboriginal Affairs (Western Australia), Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Program, Cootamundra Domestic Training Home for Aboriginal Girls. By the late 1960s, all states and territories had repealed the legislation allowing for the removal of Aboriginal children under the policy of 'protection'.

Exemption certificates were not needed after the 1967 Referendum established that Aboriginal people had full civil rights and they were abolished by the Aborigines Act 1969. ", The Board was renamed the Aborigines Welfare Board in 1940 by the Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1940, which stipulated that Aboriginal people should be assimilated into mainstream white society. The policy of the Aborigines Welfare Board was to encourage the assimilation of Aborigines into the general community. [7], The Western Australian Aborigines Protection Board operated between 1 January 1886 and 1 April 1898 as a statutory authority. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

Cite this: http://www.findandconnect.gov.au/guide/nsw/NE00034 The Board for the Protection of Aborigines was establish… The phrasing of one amendment was so broad as to enable any interpretation by the Board’s inspectors, and led to thousands of Indigenous children being taken from their parents on the basis of race alone.

Brewarrina Mission was the first institution formally established by the Aborigines Protection Board as part of its policy to segregate Aboriginal people. Central Board Appointed to Watch Over the Interests of Aborigines (1860 - 1869); Central Board for the Protection of Aborigines, Colony of Victoria (1869 - 1900); and the, Central Board for the Protection of Aborigines, State Government of Victoria (1901 - 1957). To install click the Add extension button. Dr Laurie Bamblett is a Wiradjuri researcher and author working in community development at Erambie Mission. [6]. He was active in local community organizations including the Aboriginal Protection Board, the Wheat Growers Association and the Farmers and Settlers Association. Under this act the deeds of land at the Lake Tyers Mission and Framlingham reserves were transferred to the communities.[6].

Aboriginal protection boards also known and issued permits to allow Aboriginal people the right to leave their respective missions and reserves and enter the mainstream society for a set period of time. Aboriginal protection boards also known and issued permits to allow Aboriginal people the right to leave their respective missions and reserves and enter the mainstream society for a set period of time. Aboriginal Protection Board, also known as Aborigines Protection Board, Aborigines Welfare Board, Board for the Protection of Aborigines and similar names, refers to a number of historical Australian state-run institutions with the function of regulating the lives of Aboriginal Australians. From 1883 until 1969, the lives and affairs of Aboriginal people in NSW were utterly controlled by the Aborigines Protection/Welfare Board. Collecting, publishing and research institute and is considered to be Australia's premier resource for information about the cultures and societies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal Protection Board refers to a number of historical Australian State run institutions with the function of regulating the lives of Indigenous Australians. She is particularly interested in Australian languages of New South Wales and 'contact languages'.