websites, photographic databases, publications, community service announcements, etc.) There are also many pressures on those who work in or represent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and perceived conflicts of interest may arise. Some images and knowledge may be gender-specific and may only be seen by initiated men and women. “I would like to acknowledge the Traditional Custodians on whose land this meeting takes place.”, “I would like to acknowledge the Traditional Owners of this land and pay my respects to their Elders past and present.”. [12] Janke J 2002, Writing Cultures: Protocols for Producing Indigenous Australian Literature, , Commonwealth of Australia 2002. We acknowledge those resources and authors cited, and thank the organisations that have made them available for all to use. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be given proper credit or appropriate acknowledgement for their achievements, contributions and roles in the development of media stories and/or use of cultural material. In remote locations, remember that English is often a second, third, fourth or fifth language. This led to the establishment of the Native Title Act 1993. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples these protocols include historic and current customs, practices, traditional lore and codes that are part of Aboriginal and …

What are some of the key historical events for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities? Bernard Namok of Thursday Island designed the Torres Strait Islander flag. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples should be consulted and involved in all decisions affecting their cultural heritage and in particular, on the ways in which their history, community, stories and interviews, lives and families and cultural and intellectual property are represented and used. “Indigenous people have the right to keep secret their sacred and ritual knowledge in accordance with their customary laws.”[11] Secret and sacred material refers to information that is restricted under customary law and so unsuitable for publication. An important aspect of this recognition is the acknowledgement of Traditional Owners and Elders at all MHCC’s events and activities. Because “Indigenous” is not specific, some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feel the term should be avoided. In Australia, copyright law is set out in the Copyright Act 1968. Aboriginal People in Canada and Pandemic H1N1. http://nla.gov.au/nla.arc-55164. absence or failure. Telephone (02) 6333 6111After Hours (02) 6334 2795Civic Centre Hours 8:30am - 4:45pm (Monday to Friday, except Public Holidays)Email UsemailProtector.addCloakedMailto("ep_4e3d05f0", 1); Relationships Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities and Council. Respecting community cultural protocols. “Why?” is virtually absent from conversations in remote Australian communities and observation is used instead, as a learning device, with people given information when they are deemed ready for it. For this reason, it is advisable to contact communities immediately prior to your arrival. This day commemorates the anniversary of the 1992 High Court decision in the case brought by Eddie Mabo and others, which recognised the existence in Australia of Native title rights. significantly around communication, interpersonal protocols and standards of communication effectiveness. Mainstream organisations providing advice or information about copyright and the protection of intellectual property rights include: Arts Law Centre of Australia www.artslaw.com.au, World Intellectual Property Organisation www.wipo.int, Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (2017). In Canada, ‘Aboriginal’ is constitutionally defined as Indian (hereafter referred to as First Nations unless specific to government legislation), Inuit and Métis peoples .First Nations refers to Aboriginal peoples who are neither Inuit (i.e., Arctic-settled people thought to be descendants of the Thule culture) nor Metis . Be sensitive of non-verbal cues. T 02 6273 9200 F 02 6273 9201 e: enquiries@reconciliation.org.au w: https://www.reconciliation.org.au/resources/. The protocols are consistent with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Library and Information Resource Network (ATSILIRN) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Protocols for Libraries, Archives and Information Services. Preference should be given to the term “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander” as an adjective rather than “Indigenous” as this more accurately reflects their cultural heritage. Be aware not to sound patronising by assuming a broken English or deliberately slower speech pattern when in dialogue with representatives of the local Indigenous community. Constitutional Recognition). They should be consulted on how the community will be attributed and given the opportunity to approve the way in which the material is used. linkages developed with other service providers. Official functions and activities (e.g. Protocols are an essential component when dealing with individuals and communities. Australian Indigenous Health InfoNet, This Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status provides information about: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations; the context of Indigenous health; various measures of population health status; selected health conditions; and health risk and protective factors. h�bbd```b``���� �i �de�h�I9ɲ�f.�D��o��`�4B�,��"�Z�j�A�R�"eW�H�� ��_ "��0��0��M�Y$�ϛ�������e`0�?��k� u� According to the World Intellectual Property Organisation, copyright is a legal term describing rights given to creators for their literary and artistic works. Most First Australians prefer the terms Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person or peoples; “Aborigine/s” can have negative connotations. Get Aboriginal Culture; Find resources to support you Available: https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/history/aboriginal-calendar#toc0, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Authors: Dudgeon P Milroy Helen & Walker R 2014, Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice – 2nd edition, (Australia)Government of Australia, First Australians Documentary Series This is a good beginning to develop cultural respect and to follow cultural protocol of the local area and the Indigenous community. As copyright in an artistic work usually lasts for the life of the artist plus 70 years, there is no copyright protection for ancient Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artworks such as rock art; Because copyright does not protect ideas, methods, or styles, it does not prevent others artists using styles belonging to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities such as dot painting or cross hatching; Because copyright law applies only to works which have been “recorded” in some way, it does not protect aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture which have never been written down such as some music or stories; and.

This day marks the anniversary of the 1997 tabling of the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from their Families, Bringing Them Home (April 1997). viii. h�b```b``�``e`��dd@ A�+� G����R�00pN`p�I�8怤��D�{����&ұ���d�Գs����[�Y��UI�a屈���� ��� �;8 NSW Office Premier and Cabinet, Aboriginal Engagement Strategies, All documents summarised can be downloaded for use from http://www.hsnet.nsw.gov.au/group_home.aspx?grpID=803 or from the original website listed against each summary. “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people” is a collective name for the original people of Australia and their descendants. The term “Aboriginal” does not include Torres Strait Islander people, and reference should be made to both if applicable. In story-gathering projects and in interviewing, it is important to select Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for comment on their issues rather than relying solely on self-appointed non-Aboriginal spokespeople, as worldviews can differ. Ngan Girra means ‘gathering’ and this local event celebrates the heritage of Mungabareena Reserve on the banks of the Murray River as a meeting place. Documentation of Indigenous peoples’ heritage in archives, film, photographs, videotape or audiotape and all forms of media. Frameworks for engagement should allow for the full and effective participation of indigenous peoples in the design, negotiation, implementation, monitoring, evaluation and assessment of outcomes; Aboriginal and Torres Islander Peoples and communities should be invited to participate in identifying and prioritising objectives, as well as in establishing targets and benchmarks (in the short and long term); There should be accurate and appropriate reporting on progress in addressing agreed outcomes, with adequate data collection and disaggregation; In engaging with Aboriginal and Torres Islander Peoples and communities, adopt a long term approach to planning and funding that focuses on achieving sustainable outcomes and which is responsive to the human rights and changing needs and aspirations of indigenous communities. When preparing acknowledgements and attributions, ask informants how they want to be described or identified. Be aware that there are many demands placed on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations which represent and deliver services to some of the most disadvantaged clients and communities in Australia. It is also helpful to have knowledge of the history of the Aboriginal and the Torres Strait Islander flags and to acknowledge the traditional custodians prior to all formal events. @hN��10mI��@,v_� c�f�k����X���i&�Y���JLg������dCd ��B�O10[��z�p�C1���@��{����ik7�fg`�=g��$���C�1Z H�Y� If you make a commitment to follow-up on an issue, ensure that you do, and provide feedback. The following values and principles provide a framework for implementing MHCC’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural protocols: The rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to own and control their cultural heritage, and their rights and interests in how they are portrayed (in images, text or the like), must at all times be respected and protected. Since colonisation, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have borne the brunt of extreme prejudice, discrimination and misunderstanding and their interests, rights and concerns have often been dismissed or ignored. If the Traditional Custodians cannot perform Welcome to Country, then the next step is to ask another Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person to perform ‘Acknowledgement of Country’.[21].